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Overland

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Overland last won the day on August 26 2019

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  1. Another owner recommended this holder for the plug and I can second the recommendation. It's sturdy, holds the plug securely and seems to do a great job of keeping it dry. Especially if you combine it with a jack cover like this, you shouldn't have any problems.
  2. You probably have the fan set to high or low instead of auto. The fan speed controls the fan in the AC unit, so you have to keep it set on auto with the furnace so that the AC fan doesn't come on. It's just a goofy quirk of Dometic thermostats.
  3. It’s the first I’ve heard of that. My first thought is that it really sucks, but I guess most of the alternative systems that you might buy aren’t upgradable anyway, so maybe it doesn’t matter much? Do WiFi Ranger or Wilson issue software updates?
  4. It’s been talked about before, but it’s good to have it brought up again for people who haven’t experienced it. It is odd to go out and see your trailer lights mysteriously glowing. If it’s any consolation, Airstream owners consider this a ‘feature’ and they’ll even purposefully short out the plug to keep their exterior lights on.
  5. Yeah, something isn't right there. Other unibody SUVs have higher tongue weight limits and you'd think that with tow hooks on the back, that the rear end would have to be pretty beefy anyway. The limit can't be the suspension since it has a 2000lb cargo capacity. It's got to be something with their hitch, assuming the number's not a mistake.
  6. I see that now. The brochure has some different towing numbers for the smaller engine also - 7,716lbs. I wonder why the low tongue weight? Seems really low.
  7. Yeah I had to look twice at those steel wheels. You can get the adaptive cruise on the other models - just add it as a stand alone option. I think the biggest limit on building one a la carte is that you've got to go with the SE model to get the bigger engine. So, starting at $62 I think? But actually, I just checked the specs and they say 8200lbs towing with the smaller engine. At roughly 300hp/300lbft I guess that's doable. It wouldn't be the peppiest tv but at least it's a turbo so it should keep its power at elevation. With the smaller engine, I can option one out for $62k that I'd be perfectly happy with.
  8. It's been along time coming, and it certainly isn't the classic slab-sided offroader of the past, but it packs quite a few features and it tows. In fact, the towing assist features seem to be on par with what we've seen from Ford and GM, which is quite a surprise. This might not look too bad in front of an Ollie. It has a surprisingly reasonable base price as well. Of course, you can option it out probably close to $100k if you want. But I just built an extremely capable one with all the offroad gizmos I could choose and the bigger engine and it came out almost exactly the same price as my raptor.
  9. The router will definitely connect to an outside WiFi signal - that's the WiFi as WAN feature in the specs. It doesn't boost an outside signal, but rather connects to it and then shares that connection with its own local network, same as what it does with 4g. What I don't know is whether it would act as a signal booster for 4g. I doubt that it can. But as I said, it essentially accomplishes the same task if you have WiFi calling on your phone. I think one internal and one external WiFi antenna would work best - I just need to dig out one of those antennas to try it. That, and getting one 4g antenna on a mast would be the bee's knees, as they say. Of course, by the time I actually get around to designing and building a mast, it will be time for 5g and I'll need a new router. My only disappointment with the router is that its administration pages don't display well on iOS devices. That makes doing simple tasks like connecting to an outside WiFi difficult, only because it's hard to scroll the pages, press buttons, etc. If I carried a laptop with me it wouldn't be a problem. I guess that along with that, it's not a device that's been designed for an end user. That's not a problem so long as you leave the stuff that you don't understand alone, but it does have pages of configurable gibberish that could be intimidating if you aren't at least a little tech savvy. And while I've never had to call for tech support, I would guess that all of their support is geared towards professionals rather than end users. Yes, the other connections are on the back side. And there's a dock that you can buy which will give you even more connections.
  10. Correct. We started with mattresses and were just going to get the dinette done, but then decided to go with cushions everywhere and sold the mattresses to another owner.
  11. I read that GM just cancelled the voice feature for 2020 models, unfortunately. I think onstar does require a cell signal to work, but it has a better antenna so can often get a signal when your phone can't. We pay $10 extra a month on our phone plan for the sim that goes into the cradlepoint, plus all the stupid fees and taxes that get tacked on, so I think it ends up around $15. But I just use the sim I already have from my iPad, so that way it actually costs us nothing.
  12. Possibly. My trailer was delivered sans bumper, since apparently it's part of the upholstery package, which I deleted. I never hit my head there, so I don't know if it's thanks to the net or not. Probably it does provide a subconscious visual cue.
  13. Here are the specs - WAN: Dual-modem capable with optional COR Extensibility Dock Integrated LP6 Category 6 LTE Advanced LTE modem (with DC-HSPA+ failover) or LP5 Category 6 LTE Advanced LTEmodem (with DC-HSPA+ failover) Two LAN/WAN switchable 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet ports – one default WAN (cable/DSL/T1/satellite/MetroEthernet) WiFi as WAN, Metro WiFi; 2×2 MIMO “N” 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz; 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac wave 2 (IBR900 only) LAN: Dual-band, dual-concurrent WiFi; 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac wave 2 (IBR900 only) Two LAN/WAN switchable 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet ports – one default LAN Serial console support for Out-of-Band Management of a connected device PORTS: Power 2-wire GPIO Add more GPIO ports with optional 9-wire GPIO cable or COR Extensibility Dock (see Accessories section below) USB 2.0 Two Ethernet LAN/WAN Two cellular antenna connectors (SMA) One active GPS antenna connector (SMA) Two WiFi antenna connectors (R-SMA) 15-pin dock port for COR Extensibility Dock or 9-wire GPIO cable Here's the antenna. Just drill straight through to the attic. The antenna has a threaded connection, so it bolts securely to the hull. I ran a bead of caulk around the hole and at the perimeter. The only issue I've had is that since all the antennas are outside, the wifi signal is actually better outside the trailer than in. I suspect that the reflectix insulation might be the cause of the signal loss. But it's not terrible, and since the router also came with the typical wifi antennas, I could always replace one of the external antennas with that if I wanted. Probably the best setup is to to that, and then place the second 4g antenna on an extendable mast. I never connect to local wifi, so no point for me to try to boost that signal. Maybe I should go dig one of those antennas out of the box so I don't forget. Here's where it sits in the attic -
  14. There are two WiFi antennas and you can use the second one to boost a WiFi signal if you wish. It’s possible that the 4g antennas can be used the same way but I’ve never tried If you were to use the coax port on the trailer, I think you’d want to run your own cable to it and then to whatever external antenna you’d want to use, 4g or WiFi, or both. Advantage being that you could place the second antenna for each on a mast.
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